Announcing “The Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery: A Legacy of Freedom Book Pre Orders

Now Available –Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery: A Legacy of Freedom

First, I want to thank all of the descendants for giving me the opportunity to research and connect their family to the Freedmen’s Cemetery. I truly feel that their ancestors have made me a part of their family.

The book is now available through Amazon at
https://www.amazon.com/Alexandrias-Freedmens-Cemetery-American-Heritage/dp/1467140015/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1542229048&sr=8-2&keywords=Char+McCargo+Bah.

Also the book is available through the Alexandria Black History Museum (ABHM) in Alexandria, VA. I will be launching my book signing at ABHM on February 9, 2019. If you live in the area, you might want to buy the book in Alexandria from ABHM. Some of the proceeds will go to the Alexandria Black History Museum.

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“Thank You Dad for a Great Childhood”

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “Thank You Dad for a Great Childhood”– dated June 6, 2019.

Mr. John L. Taylor’s at the Elks Lodge

Mrs. John Leonard Taylor’s maternal family has been in Alexandria, Virginia since the Civil War. This side of his family is connected to the Alexandria Freedmen Cemetery. On Mr. Taylor’s paternal side of the family, his great-grandparents where from Loudoun, Virginia.

Mr. Taylor is the youngest of four children, Donald, Charlene and Alvin. He was born in 1936 and he lived a great deal of his life in segregated Alexandria. Segregation was a way of life for many African Americans prior to 1965, but Mr. Taylor did not let the condition of segregation stop him from carving out a better life for his family. He was able to have a career at the Washington Metropolitan Transit and retired as a supervisor. Mr. Taylor was able to give his two girls an enjoyable life and he was able to purchase his own house.

Looking back, Mr. Taylor had a good life with his wife Beatrice Cross-Taylor, his daughters, parents and siblings. He was able to carve out a little bit of the American dream.

Check out the article “Thank You Dad for a Great Childhood”– dated June 6, 2019 in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 10 at http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/060519/Alexandria.pdf.

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Two Unlikely Activists Made History

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “Two Unlikely Activists Made History”– dated May 30-June 5, 2019.

Can you a lone make a difference? Yes you can. Two women from two different backgrounds brought national attention to an unknown cemetery. Their community activism impacted thousands of descendants of the Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery.

Left to Right: Lillie Finkle, former, Mayor Euille and Louise Massoud

Without these ladies efforts, I would not have known about the Freedmen’s Cemetery. And, I would not have been able to make my contribution to the Freedmen’s project in locating the descendants. So I am indebted to Lillian Finkle and Louise Massoud for all their dedicated work for the Friends of the Freedmen Cemetery.

Check out the article on “Two Unlikely Activists Made History” – dated May 30 – June 5, 2019 in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 12 at http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/052919/Alexandria.pdf. Also you can read behind the scene of this article on my blog at http://www.theotheralexandria.com.

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Remembering Two Special Ladies

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “Remembering Two Special Ladies”– dated May 23-29, 2019.

I was heavily influence by my grandmother, Kate Hawkins Scott who lived in Halifax, VA. My grandmother, Kate died in 1978 but I can still hear my grandmother’s voice in my ears today.

Mrs. Norma Jennings Turner was also influenced by her grandmother. Norma stayed with her grandparents for the first 13-years of her life. She lived around the corner from her parents and she visited her parents and younger siblings every day. The attention and training her grandmother gave her has lasted for over 85-years.

Check out this article on “Remembering Two Special Ladies”– dated May 23-29, 2019 in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 14 at http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/052219/Alexandria.pdf.

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Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article – “A Mother’s Unconditional Love”

Carolyn Phillips-McCrae
Foster daughter of Mrs. Jennie Bell-Cantey

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “A Mother’s Unconditional Love”– dated May 2-8, 2019.

Mrs. Carolyn Phillips-McCrae was extremely lucky that her mother made a decision to hand her over to Mrs. Jennie Settle Travis-Bell Cantey. She had the ability to love so many children like they were her own. It is believed that Mrs. Jennie was not raised by her own mother but whatever her childhood situation was, she impacted the lives of 44-children in a positive way.

Mrs. Carolyn heard numerous stories from Mrs. Jennie “Mama” about Fauquier County, Virginia where Mrs. Carolyn thought that was where Mama was born. Through genealogical research, I found that Mama was born in Rappahannock, Virginia. On her marriage license to her first husband, she stated that she was born in Rappahannock, Virginia. She and her first husband married in Fauquier, VA where he was born.

Check out the article on “A Mother’s Unconditional Love”– dated May 2-8, 2019 in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 12 at http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/050119/Alexandria.pdf. Also you can read behind the scene of this article on my blog at http://www.theotheralexandria.com.

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