Announcing “The Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery: A Legacy of Freedom Book Pre Orders

Now Available –Alexandria’s Freedmen’s Cemetery: A Legacy of Freedom

First, I want to thank all of the descendants for giving me the opportunity to research and connect their family to the Freedmen’s Cemetery. I truly feel that their ancestors have made me a part of their family.

The book is now available through Amazon at
https://www.amazon.com/Alexandrias-Freedmens-Cemetery-American-Heritage/dp/1467140015/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1542229048&sr=8-2&keywords=Char+McCargo+Bah.

Also the book is available through the Alexandria Black History Museum (ABHM) in Alexandria, VA. I will be launching my book signing at ABHM on February 9, 2019. If you live in the area, you might want to buy the book in Alexandria from ABHM. Some of the proceeds will go to the Alexandria Black History Museum.

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Update – Life and Times of the Livery Man

Moses Stevens – 1902 Business Listing

Update to my post on, “Life and Times of the Livery Man.” During the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries when a person was in the business of using their stables, horses, buggies, wagons and carriages for picking up people and delivering goods, they were known in some circles as the “Livery Man”.

For Moses Stevens, he was known in his community as the “Livery Man”. See the 1902 listing of Moses Stevens in the Alexandria City Directory.

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The Life and Times of the Livery Man: Moses Stevens

Moses Stevens’ Deed of Trust

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “The Life and Times of the Livery Man: Moses Stevens,” August 22, 2019.

Moses Steven was a man on a mission. He was born in 1843 in Orange County, Virginia. He was in Alexandria during the Civil War working as a laborer for the railroad. After the Civil War he married Charlotte Hedgeman. They had one son, William Henry Stevens.

Moses became wealthy in his own right. He amassed a lot of real estate and he owned his business. After the death of his wife, he married again to a widower name Carrie.

You can read the article, “The Life and Times of the Livery Man” in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 8 at http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/082119/Alexandria.pdf.

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Making History – The Dream Team

Earl Lloyd-
First African American NBA Player

Parker-Gray School was a school that gave African American children a chance to achieve their goals and to dream what they wanted in life. The teachers groomed their students to be the best in whatever they wanted to be. For many of their students, they dared to dream but Parker-Gray made them dream and showed them how to make those dreams come true.

The basketball team was called “Dream Team.” Between the years of 1944 – 1947 the Dream Team put the City of Alexandria on the map. This team was known throughout the United States when they won their 1946 title of South Scholastic Basketball Championship. The City was put on the map again in 1950 when one of their players, Earl Lloyd was the first African American to play on a NBA team.

For more about “Making History: The Dream Team,” check out the article dated August 8-14, 2019 on pages 9 and 11 at
http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/080719/Alexandria.pdf

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Coming Home to Old Alexandria

Behind the scenes of the Alexandria Gazette Packet’s article on, “Coming Home to Old Alexandria”– dated July 25 – 31, 2019.

Sherrin’s mother, Helen L. Hamilton Bell

Many African Americans migrated from Alexandria, Virginia for different reasons. The Franklin family migrated early in the 19th century to New York and the District of Columbia; later they migrated to New Jersey, Connecticut, Maryland, Minnesota and Philadelphia.

Sherrin Hamilton Bell, the 2nd great-granddaughter of Harry G. Franklin, who was born in Philadelphia was on a quest to find out about her 2nd great-grandfather. Harry left Alexandria over 100-years ago when he was buried at the Methodist Cemetery in 1901. Sherrin makes her visit to Alexandria after 118-years from the death of her 2nd great-grandfather.

When she came back home to Alexandria, she found that her family had a rich history that they left behind in Virginia. She was able to walk through the Cemetery where Harry G. Franklin and his grandparents were buried. She attended Roberts Memorial United Methodist Church where her ancestors attended in the 1800s. It was like she was walking back in time when she visited the Freedmen’s Cemetery that Harry’s great grandfather buried two of his family members in the 1860s. The Cemetery is located on Washington Street walking distant from the Church her family attended.

Coming home to Alexandria brought Sherrin a place of origin. A place that her family had talked about. A place that her family had been freed people of color as far back as the 1700s.

For more about Sherrin’s journey home, check out the article “Coming Home to Old Alexandria” July 25-31, 2019 in the Alexandria Gazette Packet on page 9 at
http://connectionarchives.com/PDF/2019/072419/Alexandria.pdf.

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