1920 Parker-Gray Class

Front Row Left to Right: Reverend A.W. Adkins, Henry T. White, Laura Dorsey, Rozier D. Lyles and James E. Howard. Back Left Row: Mayme Anderson, Margaret Young, Florence Murray, Harriet E. Thornton, Susie Madden and Sarah D. Gray

Prior to 1920, a group of concerned African American citizens which included Reverend Samuel B. Ross, Samuel Tucker, Henry Taylor, Blanche Parker Taylor and the alumni from the Hallowell and Snowden Schools pressured the City of Alexandria for a new school building.  By 1920, the African American community had a new school located at Alfred and Wythe Streets.  The school was named after two former principals at Snowden and Hallowell Schools, John F. Parker and Sarah A. Gray.

The First Faculty at Parker-Gray School included one principal and ten teachers in 1920. 

Mr. Henry T. White – Principal – taught 7th grade

Reverend Andrew Warren (A.W.) Adkins – taught 4th and 5th grades

Mrs. Mayme Anderson – taught 5th grade

Miss Laura A.  Dorsey – taught 1st grade

Mrs. Sarah D. Gray – taught 3rd grade

Mr. James E. Howard – taught 3rd grade

Mr. Rozier D. Lyles – taught 6th grade

Mrs. Susie Madden – taught 2nd grade

Mrs. Florence Murray – taught 2nd grade

Mrs. Harriet E. Thornton – taught 5th grade

Mrs. Margaret Young – taught 1st grade

This entry was posted in Education, Parker-Gray School and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to 1920 Parker-Gray Class

  1. Karen Thande says:

    Dear Char,
    Harriet E. Thornton is my great grandmother’s sister. She is the fourth person from the back left in this 1920 Parker-Gray photo.However, she is listed as Mayme Anderson. In the 1956 photo I sent you at the time of her retirement you can see the likeness. Hopefully, you can make the necessary change for historical accuracy.Thanks for a wonderful, informative website.
    .

  2. Gwen Day-Fuller says:

    Dear Char,
    I love all the work you are doing and its so great to see so much information in one place. I especially love this picture because I see so many familiar faces. It brings back so many memories and it is a reminder of the strong and dedicated individuals who took the time to educate African American students during difficult times.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s